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Title: Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. LXX, December, 1910
Author: American Society of Civil Engineers
Language: English
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TRANSACTIONS

OF THE

AMERICAN SOCIETY

OF

CIVIL ENGINEERS

(INSTITUTED 1852)

       *       *       *       *       *

VOL. LXX

DECEMBER, 1910

       *       *       *       *       *


Edited by the Secretary, under the direction of the Committee on
Publications.

Reprints from this publication, which is copyrighted, may be made
on condition that the full title of Paper, name of Author, and page
reference are given.

NEW YORK

PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY

       *       *       *       *       *

1910

       *       *       *       *       *

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1910, by the AMERICAN
SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS, in the Office of the Librarian of Congress,
                            at Washington.

       *       *       *       *       *

 NOTE.--This Society is not responsible, as a body, for the facts and
             opinions advanced in any of its publications.



CONTENTS


PAPERS

  NO.                                                               PAGE


  1167 =EXPANSION OF PIPES.=

              By =Ralph C. Taggart=                                    1

        Discussion:

              By WILLIAM D. ENNIS                                     31
                 WILLIAM KENT                                         31
                 RALPH C. TAGGART                                     32


  1168 =TESTS OF CREOSOTED TIMBER.=

              By =W.B. Gregory=                                       37


  1169 =SOME MOOTED QUESTIONS IN REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN.=

              By =Edward Godfrey=                                     54

        Discussion:

              By JOSEPH WRIGHT                                        72
                 S. BENT RUSSELL                                      73
                 J.R. WORCESTER                                       74
                 L.J. MENSCH                                          76
                 WALTER W. CLIFFORD                                   80
                 J.C. MEEM                                            82
                 GEORGE H. MYERS                                      84
                 EDWIN THACHER                                        85
                 C.A.P. TURNER                                        87
                 PAUL CHAPMAN                                         90
                 E.P. GOODRICH                                        95
                 ALBIN H. BEYER                                      102
                 JOHN C. OSTRUP                                      105
                 HARRY F. PORTER                                     111
                 JOHN STEPHEN SEWELL                                 124
                 SANFORD E. THOMPSON                                 128
                 EDWARD GODFREY                                      133


  1170 =THE WATER SUPPLY OF THE EL PASO AND SOUTHWESTERN RAILWAY
    FROM CARRIZOZO TO SANTA ROSA, N. MEX.=

              By =J.L. Campbell=                                     164

        Discussion:

              By G.E.P. SMITH                                        186
                 KENNETH ALLEN                                       186
                 J.L. CAMPBELL                                       188


  1171 =FEDERAL INVESTIGATIONS OF MINE ACCIDENTS, STRUCTURAL
    MATERIALS, AND FUELS.=

              By =Herbert M. Wilson=                                 190

        Discussion:

              By KENNETH ALLEN                                       300
                 HENRY KREISINGER                                    300
                 WALTER O. SNELLING                                  307
                 A. BARTOCCINI                                       312
                 H.G. STOTT                                          313
                 B.W. DUNN                                           314
                 HERBERT M. WILSON                                   318


  1172 =LOCOMOTIVE PERFORMANCE ON GRADES OF VARIOUS LENGTHS.=

              By =Beverly S. Randolph=                               321

        Discussion:
              By C.D. PURDON                                         329
                 JOHN C. TRAUTWINE, JR.                              330
                 BEVERLY S. RANDOLPH                                 333


  1173 =A CONCRETE WATER TOWER.=

              By =A. Kempkey, Jr.=                                   334

        Discussion:

              By MAURICE C. COUCHOT                                  348
                 L.J. MENSCH                                         348
                 A.H. MARKWART                                       349
                 A. KEMPKEY, JR.                                     350


  1174 =PRESSURE, RESISTANCE, AND STABILITY OF EARTH.=

              By =J.C. Meem=                                         352

        Discussion:

              By T. KENNARD THOMSON                                  389
                 CHARLES E. GREGORY                                  391
                 FRANCIS W. PERRY                                    392
                 E.P. GOODRICH                                       393
                 FRANCIS L. PRUYN                                    398
                 FRANK H. CARTER                                     399
                 J.C. MEEM                                           401


  1175 =THE ULTIMATE LOAD ON PILE FOUNDATIONS: A STATIC THEORY.=

              By =John H. Griffith=                                  412

        Discussion:

              By LUTHER WAGONER                                      442
                 JOHN H. GRIFFITH                                    443


  1176 =REINFORCED CONCRETE PIER CONSTRUCTION.=

              By =Eugene Klapp=                                      448

        Discussion:

              By WILLIAM ARTHUR PAYNE                                455
                 EUGENE KLAPP                                        455


  1177 =FINAL REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON RAIL SECTIONS.=         456


  1178 =ADDRESS AT THE 42d ANNUAL CONVENTION, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS,
    JUNE 21st, 1910.=

              By =John A. Bensel=                                    464

       *       *       *       *       *


MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS

       *       *       *       *       *

                                                                    PAGE

                LINUS WEED BROWN, M. AM. SOC. C.E.                   470
                CHARLES ALFRED HASBROUCK, M. AM. SOC. C.E.           473
                JOHN HENDERSON SAMPLE, M. AM. SOC. C.E.              474
                ALBERT MATHER SMITH, M. AM. SOC. C.E.                476
                JACOBUS VAN DER HOEK, M. AM. SOC. C.E.               477
                LUTHER ELMAN JOHNSON, JUN. AM. SOC. C.E.             480


PLATES

       *       *       *       *       *

  PLATE                                                      PAPER  PAGE

       I.  Specimen in Testing Machine, Showing Method of
             Support; and End Views of Tested Timbers         1168    45

      II.  Side Views of Tested Timbers                       1168    47

     III.  Junction of Beam and Wall Column, with
             Reinforcement in Place.                          1169   115

      IV.  Slab and Beam Reinforcement                        1169   121

       V.  El Paso & Southwestern System: Condensed Profile
             of Bonito Pipe Line from Bonito Creek to Pastura,
             N. Mex.                                          1170   167

      VI.  Explosion from Coal Dust in Gas and Dust Gallery
             No. 1; Mine Gallery No. 1; and Ballistic
             Pendulum                                         1171   197

     VII.  Bichel Pressure Gauges; and Rate of Detonation
             Recorder                                         1171   219

    VIII.  Explosives Calorimeter; Building No. 17, and
             Flame-Test Apparatus; and Small Lead Block Test  1171   223

      IX.  Trauzl Lead Blocks; and Powder Flames              1171   225

       X.  Separator for Grading Black Powder; Safety Lamp
             Testing Gallery; and Mine Gallery No. 2          1171   231

      XI.  Impact Machine; and Lamp Testing Box               1171   233

     XII.  Breathing and Rescue Apparatus; and Rescue
             Training Room                                    1171   235

    XIII.  Testing Beam in 200,000-lb. Machine; and Fire Test
             of Panel                                         1171   247

     XIV.  View of 10,000,000-lb. Testing Machine             1171   249

      XV.  Characteristic Failures of Reinforced Concrete
             Beams; and Arrangement of Static Load Test for
             Reinforced Concrete Beams                        1171   251

     XVI.  Brick Machine and Universal Cutter; and
             House-Heating Boilers, Building No. 21           1171   259

    XVII.  Plan of Building No. 13, Testing Station at
             Pittsburg, Pa.                                   1171   277

   XVIII.  Long Combustion Chamber; and Gas Sampling
             Combustion Chamber                               1171   279

     XIX.  Gas Producer, Economizer, and Wet Scrubber; and
             Dry Scrubber Apparatus, Long and Gas Holder      1171   283

      XX.  Charging Floor of Gas Producer; and European and
             American Briquettes                              1171   285

     XXI.  Hand Briquetting Press; and Coal Briquetting
             Machine                                          1171   291

    XXII.  Dryer for Lignite Briquetting Press; and Lignite
             Briquetting Machine                              1171   295

   XXIII.  Scaffolding for Concrete Water Tower, and
             Completed Tower                                  1173   341

    XXIV.  Sand Arch Experiments                              1174   355

     XXV.  Normal Slopes and Strata of Newly Excavated Banks  1174   359

    XXVI.  Arch Timbers, Bay Ridge Tunnel Sewer; and Normal
             Slope of Loose Sand, Gravel and Cemented Gravel  1174   363

   XXVII.  Experiments on Properties of Sand                  1174   365

  XXVIII.  Measuring Loss of Pressure in Subaqueous
             Materials; and Raising Tunnel Roof by "Bleeding"
             Sand through Displaced Plates                    1174   367

    XXIX.  Hollow California Stove-Pipe Pile; and Chenoweth
             Pile Penetrating Hard Material                   1174   385

     XXX.  Yacht Pier near Glen Cove, N.Y.                    1176   449



MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS.


=LINUS WEED BROWN, M. Am. Soc. C.E.[1]=

DIED MARCH 7TH, 1910.

In the death of Linus Weed Brown, which occurred in Monrovia, Cal., on
March 7th, 1910, this Society lost one of its valued members and the
Engineering Profession a most able exponent.

Mr. Brown was born in Burnside, Orange County, N.Y., in August, 1856,
and received his early education in the schools of that town. He
studied his profession in the Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken,
N.J.

At the age of eighteen he entered the machine shops of the Pennsylvania
Railroad, and later was employed as Draftsman by that Company, which
position he held until 1880.

In 1880 he accepted a position with the Southern Pacific Railroad in
New Orleans, La., and designed and supervised the construction of the
Algiers shops.

In 1883 Mr. Brown severed his connection with the Southern Pacific
Company and engaged in general engineering practice, principally in the
line of sugar-house installations.

In 1885 he was elected Assistant City Engineer of New Orleans, which
position he held for four years.

In 1890 he became Chief Engineer for the Caffrey Central Sugar
Refinery, designing and supervising the erection of the buildings,
which represented an expenditure of about $600,000. In the same year
Mr. Brown was appointed Chief Engineer of the Franklin and Abbeville
Railroad and built that road. At the same time he designed and built
the Des Lignes sugar-house. In fact, he designed and built many of the
large sugar mills and refineries erected in Louisiana about that time.

From 1892 to 1896 Mr. Brown held the office of City Engineer of New
Orleans, and it was during this term that some of the most important
works of his career were accomplished.

Under the direction of the City Council, and in consultation with B.M.
Harrod, Past-President, Am. Soc. C.E., the late H.B. Richardson, M.
Am. Soc. C.E., and Rudolph Hering, M. Am. Soc. C.E., Mr. Brown made
a topographical survey of New Orleans, a study of precipitation and
run-off, and prepared plans and specifications for a drainage system.

At the expiration of his term of office as City Engineer, he engaged
in private practice, assuming charge, as Chief Engineer for the
contractors, of the first construction work of the drainage system.

Prior to and during his term of office as City Engineer, Mr. Brown was
Architect of the McDonogh School Fund in New Orleans, during which time
he designed and built several new schools and remodeled a number of old
buildings.

He was also Special Engineer for the New Orleans Levee Board on harbor
and bank protection work. To the study of this work Mr. Brown devoted
all his energies and knowledge for several years. At the same time he
was a member of the New Orleans Advisory Board of Engineers on Sewerage
and Water.

When the oil fields of Texas were first discovered, Mr. Brown's
services were immediately engaged, and in the following years he
devoted almost his entire time to the development of the oil fields and
facilities for handling the oil. His operations were principally in the
Beaumont and Sour Lake fields.

The holdings of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company in these regions
demanded the services of an expert engineer, and Mr. Brown was engaged
to take full charge of its interests.

In 1904 he was compelled to give up active business and seek the
restoration of his health. To this end he spent some time in the Middle
Western States and finally decided to go out to the Pacific Coast.
The climate there proved so beneficial that he eventually settled in
Bakersfield, Cal., where he accepted an appointment as Consulting
Engineer for the Oil Department of the Southern Pacific Railroad and
Chief Engineer of the Atlantic Division of the same line.

Shortly after he accepted this appointment the Colorado River broke
through its banks and overflowed the valley known as the Salton Sea,
across which the tracks of the Southern Pacific Road were laid. The
Company was compelled to make a detour of approximately 100 miles
around the inundated region, but, under the direction of Mr. Brown,
they succeeded in closing the break with two massive dams, confining
the river to its ordinary channel and preventing the increase of the
Salton Sea.

While in California Mr. Brown invented an oil and sand separator, which
the Southern Pacific Company is now using throughout its oil fields. He
also invented a continuous water purifier and a special oil power-pump.
All these machines are now on the market.

Mr. Brown was a man of sterling integrity; one who regarded his
profession in the light of an obligatory public service. To this sense
of duty he sacrificed much, primarily the necessary relaxation and rest
from arduous labor, which undoubtedly accelerated the end of his useful
and honorable career.

In recognition of the valuable services he rendered in connection
with the levee protection work in New Orleans, Mr. Brown was made the
recipient of public honors and testimonials of appreciation.

He is survived by a daughter and two sons; the latter are preparing
to follow the engineering profession. His wife, who was Miss Joan Von
Vesterfeldt of New York City, died in 1903.

Mr. Brown was elected a Member of the American Society of Civil
Engineers on June 7th, 1899. He was also a Member of the Louisiana
Engineering Society.

FOOTNOTES:

[1] Memoir prepared by Ole K. Olsen, Esq.


=CHARLES ALFRED HASBROUCK, M. Am. Soc. C.E.=[2]

DIED FEBRUARY 1ST, 1910.


Charles Alfred Hasbrouck was born at Forest Home, a suburb of Ithaca,
N.Y., on July 31st, 1864. After studying in the schools at Ithaca, he
entered Cornell University in 1880, from which, after completing a
course in Civil Engineering, he was graduated in 1884, the youngest
member of his class.

In July, 1884, Mr. Hasbrouck entered upon his professional career as
Assistant Engineer of the Detroit Bridge and Iron Company, continuing
with that firm until 1888. From August to November, 1888, he was
employed with the King Bridge Company as Assistant Engineer.

In November, 1888, he was appointed Assistant Chief Engineer of
the American Bridge Works, of Chicago, specializing in bridge and
structural engineering.

In May, 1900, Mr. Hasbrouck was made Contracting Manager of the
American Bridge Company, of New York, in charge of railroad structures
on the Western Division, which position he held until his health
failed. Thus, after 24 years of active service in his Profession, he
was obliged to give up all work.

On June 14th, 1893, Mr. Hasbrouck was married to Miss Mary Fobes, of
Cresco, Iowa, who died in 1907.

After retiring from business, Mr. Hasbrouck spent part of his time
in El Paso, Tex., in search of health. In 1909, he went to Sierra
Madre, and, later, to Pasadena, Cal., where he died on February 1st,
1910. He was a patient sufferer, never uttering a word of annoyance or
fretfulness at his condition.

At his expressed wish, he was buried from his boyhood home which he
had always kept up, and which, with its beautiful grounds, he left to
Cornell University.

Mr. Hasbrouck was elected an Associate Member of the American Society
of Civil Engineers on February 3d, 1892, and a Member on December 5th,
1894. He was elected a Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, of
Great Britain, on February 2d, 1904.

FOOTNOTES:

[2] Memoir prepared by Mr. Edward Capouch, Contracting Manager,
American Bridge Company, Chicago, Ill.


=JOHN HENDERSON SAMPLE, M. Am. Soc. C.E.=[3]

DIED MARCH 4TH, 1910.


John Henderson Sample, the only son of Judge William Sample, was born
on April 3d, 1849, at Coshocton, Ohio. He entered Dennison University,
Granville, Ohio, from which he was graduated in 1872. After leaving
college, he was engaged on the early surveys of the Toledo and Ohio
Central lines, working up from Axeman to Division Engineer.

Afterward Mr. Sample served as Chief Engineer of the Cincinnati,
Lebanon, and Northern Railway, and Chief Engineer of the Cincinnati
and Georgia (now the Southern Railway), from Rome to Macon, Ga.,
except from Austell to Atlanta. In 1883, he made surveys for the East
Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railway (now the Southern Railway)
in Alabama. He then became Chief Engineer of the Alabama Improvement
Company, engaged in the location and construction of the Northern
Alabama Railroad, and the development of coal and ore lands and the
Town of Sheffield, Ala.

He was appointed Chief Engineer of the Toledo and Ann Arbor, on
location and construction from Hammond Junction to Durand; Chief
Engineer of location and construction of the Missouri Pacific lines in
Kansas, Colorado, and Missouri; and from 1887 to 1889, he served as
Chief Engineer on the construction of the Louisville, Henderson, and
St. Louis Railway, from West Point to Henderson, Ky.

Mr. Sample made examinations and reports on timber and mineral lands
in Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia, and in 1889, he
examined and reported on the Mexican National Railroad, from Laredo,
Tex., to the City of Mexico.

From 1889 to 1896, he was Chief Engineer of location and construction
and General Superintendent of operation of the Pittsburg, Akron,
and Western Railroad, from Delphos to Akron, Ohio. In 1897 he was
appointed General Superintendent of the Cleveland, Akron, and Columbus
Railroad, which position he held until this road was purchased by the
Pennsylvania Company, in September, 1899. From that date to the time of
his death, Mr. Sample was in the employ of the Pennsylvania Company,
as Assistant Engineer, being engaged on line and grade revision and
special work.

His father being a lawyer and Judge, he partook of his judicial nature,
and all his lifework was based on the broad foundation of equity and
honesty of purpose. He was a man of unobtrusive manner, retiring
disposition, and unpretentious ways.

On June 7th, 1876, Mr. Sample was married to Miss Virginia Hughes. His
wife died on June 24th, 1889.

Mr. Sample died suddenly in the Fort Pitt Hotel, at Pittsburg, Pa., on
March 4th, 1910. He intended to leave for New York City during the day
to bid farewell to his son, who was Assistant Engineer on the Madeira
and Mamoré Railway, in Brazil, and had been spending his vacation of
three months with his father.

To his children, and to those who knew him intimately, Mr. Sample
leaves a memory of a life well rounded out by noble endeavor, and a
fixedness of purpose to know and do the right. He was conscientious in
every act and thought, a man of deep religious conviction, and though
called suddenly from his earthly labors, he was ready for the higher
service and duty.

Mr. Sample was elected a Member of the American Society of Civil
Engineers on October 6th, 1886.

FOOTNOTES:

[3] Memoir prepared by W.B. Hanlon, Esq.


=ALBERT MATHER SMITH, M. Am. Soc. C.E.=[4]

DIED FEBRUARY 27TH, 1910.


Albert Mather Smith was born on October 5th, 1837, in New York City.
He was the son of Charles Smith and Miss Alleta Loverich, and a direct
descendant of Cotton Mather.

As a boy of fifteen he entered the Engineer Division of the Manhattan
Gas Light Company, and later became Engineer of its West 18th Street
Station. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Mr. Smith joined the
37th Regiment, New York Volunteers, organized by Colonel Roome, the
President of the Manhattan Gas Light Company, and was chosen Captain
of Company B. This Company was largely recruited from the force of
the gas-works, and drilled in the office of the Gas Company at 4
Irving Place, New York City. Mr. Smith's regiment saw active service
during the invasion of Pennsylvania, and also as special detail on the
Chesapeake; and, later, during the Draft Riots in New York City.

After the close of the War, Mr. Smith became Chief Engineer of the
Manhattan Gas Light Company, and, later, when this Company was merged
into the Consolidated Gas Company, he became Engineer of Distribution
of the latter Company. At the time of his death he had been connected
with the gas companies of New York City for 57 years.

On March 18th, 1863, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Anna Provoost Elwes,
who died on January 14th, 1873. In 1878, Mr. Smith was married to his
second wife, Miss Jane H. Bull. His widow, two sons, and a daughter
survive him.

Mr. Smith was a Charter Member and Vice-President of the Society of Gas
Lighting, the oldest existing gas association in the United States. He
was elected a Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers on May
5th, 1886.

FOOTNOTES:

[4] Memoir prepared by W. Cullen Morris, M. Am. Soc. C.E.


=JACOBUS VAN DER HOEK, M. Am. Soc. C.E.=[5]

DIED DECEMBER 22D, 1909.


Jacobus Van der Hoek, son of the late Gysbertus Van der Hoek and
Johanna (Tupers) Van der Hoek, was born at Goes, The Netherlands,
on March 19th, 1862. He received his early education at the Public
Schools, and was graduated from the High School of his native town in
August, 1879. In September of the same year he entered the Polytechnic
School at Delft, The Netherlands, from which he was graduated, as Civil
Engineer, in July, 1883.

During 1884 Mr. Van der Hoek was employed as Inspector on the
construction of a dike across the "het slaak," a shallow tidewater
1-1/2 miles wide, and made surveys and soundings for a record map of
adjacent waters covering an area of 6 sq. miles.

In 1885 and 1886 he was employed by the Dutch Government as Assistant
Engineer in charge of a party, to re-survey the principal rivers of
Holland, and triangulated about 25 miles of river.

During 1887 Mr. Van der Hoek was Engineer in charge of the submarine
shore protection for the "Polder of Schouwen," The Netherlands. In 1887
he left his native land for the United States, arriving in New York
City, on December 25th.

From the latter part of 1888 to the beginning of 1890, he was employed
by the Wheeling Bridge and Terminal Railway Company, at Wheeling, W.
Va., under the late Job Abbott, M. Am. Soc. C.E., Chief Engineer.
The work comprised steam railway construction, a bridge 2,000 ft. in
length, including one span over the Ohio River, 525 ft. long, and three
tunnels from 400 to 2,400 ft. long, all double-track and heavy work
throughout. The Engineer who was in charge of the work, writes:

    "Mr. Van der Hoek reported to me as Chief Draftsman and
    Office Assistant during the period above mentioned. He was so
    capable and earnest in all of his work, and so well qualified
    to perform it, that our relations were not only uniformly
    pleasant, but they marked the beginning of a friendship that
    lasted until the deplorable end of Mr. Van der Hoek's useful
    life."

In 1890, Mr. Van der Hoek entered the service of the Lehigh Valley
Railroad and continued with this Company until July, 1909; during
this time he was successively engaged as Chief Draftsman, Assistant,
Resident, and Division Engineer. During the extension of the main line
of the Lehigh Valley Railroad, from Sayre to Buffalo, he was employed
as Chief Draftsman, designing masonry and other structures, also as
Assistant and Resident Engineer in charge of certain sections of the
line. Paul S. King, M. Am. Soc. C.E., the Chief Engineer in charge
of the construction of this 175 miles of double-track railroad, soon
recognized the exceptional engineering ability of Mr. Van der Hoek, and
appointed him, successively, Assistant and Resident Engineer in charge
of several sections; of his success and ability, Mr. King writes:

    "The sad and sudden death of Mr. Van der Hoek was indeed
    a great shock to me and his many friends in the Lehigh
    Valley System, particularly in New York State, his field of
    professional work for so many years.

    "I highly regarded his technical ability, sterling character,
    and untiring industry, both in the field and office. During the
    time he was engaged with me (nearly four years), he filled the
    positions of Chief Draftsman, Assistant, and Resident Engineer,
    and earned the respective promotions by the zeal and energy
    which was always characteristic of him with any work he had
    in hand. He continued throughout the period of construction,
    a record not equalled by any of the dozen or more Resident
    Engineers connected with that work. It was this observation of
    his conduct and activity in executing his work that warranted
    me to have confidence in his ability to take up the work to be
    done after the Operating Department took charge of the line,
    recommending him as the Engineer for Maintenance of Way of part
    of the new line."

In 1893, Mr. Van der Hoek was appointed Division Engineer of the
Buffalo Division of the Lehigh Valley Railroad, and had charge, under
the Superintendent of Maintenance of Way, of constructing stations,
water stations, coal trestles, wharves, stone ballasting the line,
building storage yards, rebuilding bridges, etc.; he continued in this
position until July 1st, 1909.

One of his associates on the Lehigh Valley Railroad writes:

    "I was intimately acquainted with Mr. Van der Hoek and his
    work from 1894 to the time of his death, and as a co-worker
    on the Lehigh Valley Railroad it is a privilege to testify to
    his exceptional engineering ability, his strong, unflinching
    character, his untiring energy, and implicit adherence to the
    lines of duty. He had exceptional executive ability combined
    with a thorough knowledge of details. It was these qualities
    that made him so successful in his work.

    "Mr. Van der Hoek was a sober, unassuming, and honest man, a
    generous and respected superior to his subordinates, a true
    friend, ever ready to assist an aspiring young man to greater
    knowledge and better positions; by these he will be truly
    missed and mourned."

On July 12th, 1909, Mr. Van der Hoek entered the service of the Lehigh
Coal and Navigation Company, as Civil Engineer, under the General
Superintendent of that company, at Lansford, Pa., to take charge of
the railroad maintenance, water supply, land surveys, and new outside
construction, on the extensive mining properties of that company in the
anthracite coal fields.

Mr. Van der Hoek's exceptional ability was thoroughly recognized by
his new employers, and his work and its results were fully appreciated;
he had but laid his plans and perfected a proper organization when,
on the afternoon of December 22d, 1909, while inspecting the work of
laying a new water main through the Lansford, Pa., tunnel, he met his
death by being run over by an engine, and his successful professional
career was thus sadly ended. His Assistant, who had accompanied him on
this inspection, met with the same lamentable fate.

On May 30th, 1896, Mr. Van der Hoek was married, in New York City, to
Johanna Van der Bent, and is survived by his wife and two children.

He was elected a Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers on
April 7th, 1897.

FOOTNOTES:

[5] Memoir prepared by F.E. Schall, D.C. Henny, H.F. Dunham and Paul S.
King, Members, Am. Soc. C.E.


=LUTHER ELMAN JOHNSON, Jun, Am. Soc. C.E.=[6]

DIED MARCH 23D, 1910.


By the death of Luther Elman Johnson, the Engineering Profession has
lost a bright and able young engineer whose career, though short, gave
promise of a steady rise and a brilliant future.

Mr. Johnson, the son of Mr. and Mrs. M.D. Johnson, of Lawton, Okla.,
was born in Union, West Va., on August 10th, 1881. Most of his
childhood and early manhood, however, were spent in Missouri. He
received his High School training at Nevada, Mo., and his technical
education at the Missouri State University, from which he was graduated
in 1904, on his completion of the four years' course in Civil
Engineering. In connection with the training at the University, Mr.
Johnson, on graduation, was appointed and commissioned Brevet Second
Lieutenant, in the National Guard of Missouri, by the Governor of the
State.

His professional work began shortly after graduation, with his
employment in the United States Reclamation Service, in connection with
investigations of reservoir sites for the storage of irrigation water
in Oklahoma. Following this, Mr. Johnson was transferred to the Garden
City, Kans., pumping project, where, from 1905 to 1907, he was engaged
in concrete construction and other work. In the latter part of 1907,
he was transferred to the Minidoka, Idaho, pumping project, where, as
Assistant Engineer, he was engaged until shortly before his death.

His work on the latter project was in connection with the location and
construction of canals, and he was in active charge of the building
of a large number of small reinforced concrete and timber structures
and bridges for the irrigation system. In prosecuting this work, Mr.
Johnson showed ability of the first order, and gave evidence, by his
conscientious, thorough, and careful work, of great promise for the
future.

In March, 1910, his health failing, he returned to his home in Lawton,
Okla., to recuperate from a general breakdown, but pneumonia set in,
and he died on March 23d.

Mr. Johnson was a young man of sterling qualities and rugged honesty;
his life was clean and strong, his character sweet and lovable, and his
capabilities exceptional. Untiring devotion to and interest in his work
were traits which had won for him the deepest respect of his associates
and those who worked under his direction, and his death was a keen
loss, not only to his family to whom he was a devoted son and brother,
but to his many friends and to all those with whom his work brought him
in contact.

Mr. Johnson was elected a Junior of the American Society of Civil
Engineers on September 6th, 1904.

FOOTNOTES:

[6] Memoir prepared by P.M. Fogg, Assoc. M. Am. Soc. C.E.

TRANSACTIONS

OF THE

American Society of Civil Engineers

       *       *       *       *       *



INDEX

VOLUME LXX

DECEMBER, 1910


       *       *       *       *       *

SUBJECT INDEX, PAGE 482

AUTHOR INDEX, PAGE 486

       *       *       *       *       *

Titles of papers are in quotation marks when given with the author's
name.

VOLUME LXX

       *       *       *       *       *


=SUBJECT INDEX=

       *       *       *       *       *


=ACCIDENTS.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine----, Structural Materials, and
        Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With Discussion.) 190.


=ADDRESSES.=

    "Address at the 42d Annual Convention, Chicago, Illinois, June
        21st, 1910." John A. Bensel. 464.


=BLASTING.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=BOILERS.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=BRACING.=

    "Pressure, Resistance, and Stability of Earth." J.C. Meem.
        (With Discussion.) 352.


=BUILDING STONE.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=CEMENT.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=CLAY.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=COAL.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=CONCRETE.=

    "A ---- Water Tower." A. Kempkey, Jr. (With Discussion.) 334.

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.

    "Reinforced ---- Pier Construction." Eugene Klapp. (With
        Discussion.) 448.


=EARTH PRESSURES.=

    "Pressure, Resistance, and Stability of Earth." J.C. Meem. 352.

    Discussion: T. Kennard Thomson, Charles E. Gregory, Francis
        W. Perry, E.P. Goodrich, Francis L. Pruyn, and Frank H.
        Carter, 389.


=EXCAVATIONS.=

    "Pressure, Resistance, and Stability of Earth." J.C. Meem.
        (With Discussion.) 352.


=EXPLOSIVES.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=FIRE PROOFING.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=FOUNDATIONS.=

    "The Ultimate Load on Pile----: A Static Theory." John H.
        Griffith. 412.

    Discussion: Luther Wagoner, 442.


=FUEL.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=GRADES.=

    "Locomotive Performance on ---- of Various Lengths." Beverly S.
        Randolph. (With Discussion.) 321.


=HEATING.=

    "Expansion of Pipes." Ralph C. Taggart. (With Discussion.) 1.

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=LOCOMOTIVES.=

    _See_ =ROLLING STOCK.=


=MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS.=

    Brown, Linus Weed. 470.

    Hasbrouck, Charles Alfred. 473.

    Johnson, Luther Elman. 480.

    Sample, John Henderson. 474.

    Smith, Albert Mather. 476.

    Van der Hoek, Jacobus. 477.


=MINING.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. 190.

    Discussion: Kenneth Allen, Henry Kreisinger, Walter O.
        Snelling, A. Bartoccini, H.G. Stott, and B.W. Dunn, 300.


=PILES.=

    "The Ultimate Load on Pile Foundations: A Static Theory," John
        H. Griffith. (With Discussion.) 412.


=PIPE.=

    "Expansion of Pipes." Ralph C. Taggart. 1.

    Discussion: William D. Ennis, and William Kent, 31.

    "The Water Supply of the El Paso and Southwestern Railway from
        Carrizozo to Santa Rosa, N. Mex." J.L. Campbell. (With
        Discussion.) 164.


=PIPE-LINES.=

    ---- for railroad water supply. 164.


=PRESERVATION OF TIMBER.=

    "Tests of Creosoted Timber." W.B. Gregory. 37.


=RAILROADS.=

    "Locomotive Performance on Grades of Various Lengths." Beverly
        S. Randolph. (With Discussion.) 321.


=RAILS.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=REINFORCED CONCRETE.=

    "Some Mooted Questions in ---- Design." Edward Godfrey. 54.

    Discussion: Joseph Wright, S. Bent Russell, J.R. Worcester,
        L.J. Mensch, Walter W. Clifford, J.C. Meem, George H.
        Myers, Edwin Thacher, C.A.P. Turner, Paul Chapman, E.P.
        Goodrich, Albin H. Beyer, John C. Ostrup, Harry F. Porter,
        John Stephen Sewell, and Sanford E. Thompson, 72.


=REPORTS OF COMMITTEES.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." Joseph
        T. Richards, C.W. Buchholz, E.C. Carter, S.M. Felton,
        Robert W. Hunt, John D. Isaacs, Richard Montfort, H.G.
        Prout, Percival Roberts, Jr., George E. Thackray, Edmund K.
        Turner, and William R. Webster, 456.


=RESERVOIRS.=

    Description of----. 174.


=ROLLING STOCK.=

    "Locomotive Performance on Grades of Various Lengths." Beverly
        S. Randolph. 321.

    Discussion: C.D. Purdon, and John C. Trautwine, Jr., 329.


=SAFETY LAMPS.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=SHAFT SINKING.=

    "Pressure, Resistance, and Stability of Earth." J.C. Meem.
        (With Discussion.) 352.


=SHEATHING.=

    "Pressure, Resistance, and Stability of Earth." J.C. Meem.
        (With Discussion.) 352.


=STAND-PIPES.=

    "A Concrete Water Tower." A. Kempkey, Jr. 334.

    Discussion: Maurice C. Couchot, L.J. Mensch, and A.H. Markwart,
        348.


=TESTING MACHINES.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." Herbert M. Wilson. (With
        Discussion.) 190.


=TIMBER.=

    "Tests of Creosoted----." W.B. Gregory. 37.


=TOWERS.=

    "A Concrete Water Tower." A. Kempkey, Jr. (With Discussion.)
        334.


=TRAIN LOADS.=

    "Locomotive Performance on Grades of Various Lengths." Beverly
        S. Randolph. (With Discussion.) 321.


=TUNNELS.=

    "Pressure, Resistance, and Stability of Earth." J.C. Meem.
        (With Discussion.) 352.


=WATER, FLOW OF, IN PIPES.=

    Data regarding----. 178.


=WATER-WORKS.=

    "The Water Supply of the El Paso and Southwestern Railway from
        Carrizozo to Santa Rosa, N. Mex." J.L. Campbell, 164.

    Discussion: G.E.P. Smith, and Kenneth Allen, 186.

    _See also_ =STAND-PIPES.=


=WHARVES.=

    "Reinforced Concrete Pier Construction." Eugene Klapp. 448.

    Discussion: William Arthur Payne, 455.


=WOOD.=

    _See_ =TIMBER.=


=WOOD-PIPE.=

    Old ---- in large cities. 186.

    "The Water Supply of the El Paso and Southwestern Railway from
        Carrizozo to Santa Rosa, N. Mex." J.L. Campbell. (With
        Discussion.) 164.


=AUTHOR INDEX=


=ALLEN, KENNETH.=

    Investigations of fuels. 300.

    Railroad water supply. 186.


=BARTOCCINI, A.=

    Investigations of mine accidents. 312.


=BENSEL, JOHN A.=

    "Address at the 42d Annual Convention, Chicago, Illinois, June
        21st, 1910." 464.


=BEYER, ALBIN H.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 102.


=BROWN, LINUS WEED.=

    Memoir of. 470.


=BUCHHOLZ, C.W.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=CAMPBELL, J.L.=

    "The Water Supply of the El Paso and Southwestern Railway from
        Carrizozo to Santa Rosa, N. Mex." 164.


=CARTER, E.C.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=CARTER, FRANK H.=

    Earth pressure and stability. 399.


=CHAPMAN, PAUL.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 90.


=CLIFFORD, WALTER W.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 80.


=COUCHOT, MAURICE C.=

    A concrete water tower. 348.


=DUNN, B.W.=

    Investigations of explosives. 314.


=ENNIS, WILLIAM D.=

    Expansion of pipes. 31.


=FELTON, S.M.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=GODFREY, EDWARD.=

    "Some Mooted Questions in Reinforced Concrete Design." 54.


=GOODRICH, E.P.=

    Earth pressure and stability. 393.

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 95.


=GREGORY, CHARLES E.=

    Earth pressure and stability. 391.


=GREGORY, W.B.=

    "Tests of Creosoted Timber." 37.


=GRIFFITH, JOHN H.=

    "The Ultimate Load on Pile Foundations: A Static Theory." 412.


=HASBROUCK, CHARLES ALFRED.=

    Memoir of. 473.


=HUNT, ROBERT W.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=ISAACS, JOHN D.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=JOHNSON, LUTHER ELMAN.=

    Memoir of. 480.


=KEMPKEY, A., Jr.=

    "A Concrete Water Tower." 334.


=KENT, WILLIAM.=

    Expansion of pipes. 31.


=KLAPP, EUGENE.=

    "Reinforced Concrete Pier Construction." 448.


=KREISINGER, HENRY.=

    Investigations of fuels. 300.


=MARKWART, A.H.=

    A concrete water tower. 349.


=MEEM, J.C.=

    "Pressure, Resistance, and Stability of Earth." 352.

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 82.


=MENSCH, L.J.=

    A concrete water tower. 348.

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 76.


=MONTFORT, RICHARD.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=MYERS, GEORGE H.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 84.


=OSTRUP, JOHN C.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 105.


=PAYNE, WILLIAM ARTHUR.=

    Reinforced concrete pier construction. 455.


=PERRY, FRANCIS W.=

    Earth pressure and stability. 392.


=PORTER, HARRY F.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 111.


=PROUT, H.G.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=PRUYN, FRANCIS L.=

    Earth pressure and stability. 398.


=PURDON, C.D.=

    Locomotive performance on grades, 329.


=RANDOLPH, BEVERLY S.=

    "Locomotive Performance on Grades of Various Lengths." 321.


=RICHARDS, JOSEPH T.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=ROBERTS, PERCIVAL, Jr.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=RUSSELL, S. BENT.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 73.


=SAMPLE, JOHN HENDERSON.=

    Memoir of. 474.


=SEWELL, JOHN STEPHEN.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 124.


=SMITH, ALBERT MATHER.=

    Memoir of. 476.


=SMITH, G.E.P.=

    Railroad water supply. 186.


=SNELLING, WALTER O.=

    Investigations of explosives. 307.


=STOTT, H.G.=

    Investigations of efficiency of gas engines. 313.


=TAGGART, RALPH C.=

    "Expansion of Pipes." 1.


=THACHER, EDWIN.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 85.


=THACKRAY, GEORGE E.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=THOMPSON, SANFORD E.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 128.


=THOMSON, T. KENNARD.=

    Earth pressure and stability. 389.


=TRAUTWINE, JOHN C., Jr.=

    Locomotive performance on grades. 330.


=TURNER, C.A.P.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 87.


=TURNER, EDMUND K.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=VAN DER HOEK, JACOBUS.=

    Memoir of. 477.


=WAGONER, LUTHER.=

    Ultimate load on pile foundations. 442.


=WEBSTER, WILLIAM R.=

    "Final Report of Special Committee on Rail Sections." 456.


=WILSON, HERBERT M.=

    "Federal Investigations of Mine Accidents, Structural
        Materials, and Fuels." 190.


=WORCESTER, J.R.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 74.


=WRIGHT, JOSEPH.=

    Questions in reinforced concrete design. 72.



    Transcriber's Notes:

    The following external works are required to complete this
    volume. Links are provided to the Doctrine Publishing Corporation download
    page for the designated work.


    1168 TESTS OF CREOSOTED TIMBER.

    1169 SOME MOOTED QUESTIONS IN REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN.

    1170 THE WATER SUPPLY OF THE EL PASO AND SOUTHWESTERN
    RAILWAY FROM CARRIZOZO TO SANTA ROSA, N. MEX.

    1171 FEDERAL INVESTIGATIONS OF MINE ACCIDENTS, STRUCTURAL

    1172 LOCOMOTIVE PERFORMANCE ON GRADES OF VARIOUS LENGTHS.

    1173 A CONCRETE WATER TOWER.

    1174 PRESSURE, RESISTANCE, AND STABILITY OF EARTH.

    1175 THE ULTIMATE LOAD ON PILE FOUNDATIONS: A STATIC THEORY.

    1176 REINFORCED CONCRETE PIER CONSTRUCTION.

    1177 FINAL REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON RAIL SECTIONS.

    1178 ADDRESS AT THE 42d ANNUAL CONVENTION, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS,

    Simple spelling, grammar, and typographical errors were
    corrected.

    Italics markup is enclosed in _underscores_.

    Bold markup is enclosed in =equals=.





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